English

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The English Department’s curriculum is designed to develop students’ understanding of the English language and the literature written in that language while also fostering analytical ability and writing skills. Students who complete the English major will comprehend the historical and cultural context of literature and will see literature as a reflection of diverse cultures.

They will learn how to use the written word to communicate clearly, effectively, accurately, logically, and gracefully. They will also be able to speak and write effectively on a wide range of literary issues and to apply analytical reasoning to literary texts.

Students have many opportunities for involvement outside the classroom. They may join the English honor society (Sigma Tau Delta), write for the campus newspaper (The Georgetonian), and contribute to and edit the student literary magazine (Inscape). Qualified students may tutor their peers in the Writing Center and in literature survey classes.

Many of our English majors go on to graduate school in journalism, literary studies, law, ministry, communications, or creative writing. Upon graduation, others enter a variety of fields, such as personnel management, public relations, writing, business, or teaching. A student majoring in English will develop the flexibility of mind that comes from a broadly based liberal education.

Students who successfully complete the English major will:

  • demonstrate core knowledge of the English literary tradition;
  • show familiarity with key works of American and world literature;
  • apply understanding of diverse historical and cultural contexts to literature;
  • speak skillfully on a range of literary topics;
  • read literature analytically;
  • communicate skillfully in writing.

Additionally, students who are English majors with a creative writing emphasis or who are creative writing minors will demonstrate:

  • improvement in their creative writing in one or more of three genres: fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction;
  • an ability to apply editing skills to their own writing by effective revision;
  • an ability to apply editing skills to the writing of others, both by line editing and writing reading responses; and
  • a capacity to apply analytical reasoning to literature to discuss not only its formal elements such as plot and imagery, but also to discuss the techniques that writers have used to achieve these effects.

Students have many opportunities for involvement outside the classroom. They may join the English honor society (Sigma Tau Delta), write for the campus

For more information about the English major leading to a teaching certification please contact the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.

Degree Type: Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Program Contact: Professor Holly Barbaccia

 

 

Majors and Minors

Classes

AMS250 : Introduction to American Studies

An interdisciplinary seminar that introduces students to the concept of American Studies and applies various disciplinary perspectives to a focused topic announced at registration.

Credit Hour(s)

3

AMS450 : Senior American Studies Seminar

An interdisciplinary seminar that requires students to integrate understanding from the various disciplines represented in the study of American culture. Serves as the capstone for the American Studies major but is open to students from all disciplines with an interest in the field.

Credit Hour(s)

3

ENG111 : English Composition I

Develops satisfactory college-level proficiency in basic skills of composition and reading comprehension. Students must demonstrate their ability to produce a portfolio of literate, reasonably logical, and perceptive short themes. Grades given are A, B, C, or X (conditional incomplete, to be satisfied by repeating the course). All students must be enrolled in ENG111or ENG112 until they have successfully completed the freshman writing sequence. For a student to drop ENG111, the drop slip must be signed by either the Chair of the English Department or the Writing Program Coordinator. The Chair of the English Department or the Writing Program Coordinator may waive this continuous enrollment policy as appropriate.

Credit Hour(s)

3

ENG112 : English Composition II

Introduces research techniques and instruction in the principles of documentation and scholarship as well as continues a concern with rhetoric, style, clear thinking, reading comprehension, and successful communication. Orients the student to computer literacy and the use of the library. All students must be enrolled in ENG111or ENG112 until they have successfully completed the freshman writing sequence. For a student to drop ENG112, the drop slip must be signed by either the Chair of the English Department or the Writing Program Coordinator. The Chair of the English Department or the Writing Program Coordinator may waive this continuous enrollment policy as appropriate.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG111. All students must be enrolled in ENG111, ENG112, or ENG115 until they have successfully completed
the freshman writing sequence.

ENG196 : Topics in World Literature

Chronological survey of no fewer than three successive periods of literature. Topic and specific course content to be determined by professor and announced at advanced registration. Offered exclusively as a Foundations 112 course.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

FDN111.

ENG211 : English Literature Survey I

Chronological survey of English literature from Beowulf through Milton, with emphasis on the greats.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

ENG213 : English Literature Survey II

Chronological survey of English literature from the Restoration through James Joyce, with special emphasis on the greats.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

ENG292 : Introduction to Literary Analysis

Introduction to the skills and methods of literary analysis. Designed to supplement the introductory English literature survey courses. Must be taken prior to or concurrently with the major’s first 300- or 400-level literature class in English. Student majoring in English should enroll in this course as early as possible. Minors are also encouraged to enroll.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

Corequisites

ENG211, 213, 296, 298, or the first 300- or 400-level literature class.

ENG296 : World Literature Survey I

Chronological survey of world literature in translation from antiquity to the seventeenth century.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

ENG298 : World Literature Survey II

Chronological survey of world literature in translation from the seventeenth century to the present day.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

ENG311 : Medieval Literature

Studies in the original language of English poetry, prose, and drama, excluding Chaucer.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG313 : Renaissance Literature

Literature of the English Renaissance, excluding the works of Shakespeare and Milton.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG321 : Neo-Classical Literature

Drama, prose, and poetry of representative figures of England’s Age of Enlightenment.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG323 : British Romantic Literature

A survey of British poetry and prose composed between 1789 and 1832, with emphasis on the six major Romantic poets.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG327 : Victorian Literature

A survey of British poetry, drama, and fiction written between 1832 and 1900.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG329 : English Novel

The novel as a prose form, from its introduction to the beginning of the twentieth century.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG331 : Modern Literature

A survey of modern poetry, drama, and fiction written during the first half of the twentieth century.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG345 : American Literature from 1870

History and interpretation of American literature from Emily Dickinson through the twentieth century.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

ENG347 : American Novel

The novel in America, from the beginnings to the late twentieth century.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG349 : Southern Novel

The novel as representative of the culture of the American South, from the beginnings to the late twentieth century.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG352 : Media Journalism

Principles and problems of news and feature writing for print media.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

ENG356 : Linguistics

English language and grammar compared to other languages and their dialects based on structural and transformational principles to facilitate understanding of language arts. May include language acquisition, psycholinguistics (and its parallels to computational linguistics), sociolinguistics, and neurolinguistics.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

ENG361 : Creative Writing: Poetry

Introduces students to poetry writing. Students work within a workshop atmosphere, providing and accepting critiques of their writing and the writing of others. In addition, there will be in-depth discussions of some classic and contemporary work by established writers.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

ENG363 : Creative Writing: Fiction

Introduces students to fiction writing. Students work within a workshop atmosphere, providing and accepting critiques of their own writing and the writing of others. Repeatable to 9 hours.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

ENG365 : Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction

Combines reading and writing in creative nonfiction. Students will explore contemporary examples in the field, examining literary techniques while developing their own writing. Students will work within several sub-genres, including memoir, travel writing, and interview/feature writing. Students work within a workshop atmosphere, providing and accepting critiques of their writing and the writing of others.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

ENG375 : Tutorial Topics

Special topics in literature; use of one-onone tutorial method of instruction adapted from humanities courses at Oxford University.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298, and permission of instructor.

ENG407 : Contemporary Fiction

A study of the development of the genre of fiction, including the short story, the short novel, and the novel, from 1900 to the present.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

ENG409 : Contemporary Drama

A study of the development of modern drama from Henrik Ibsen to the present.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

ENG412 : Chaucer

A study of the works of Chaucer, particularly the Canterbury Tales, with emphasis on Chaucer’s contribution to the development of the English language.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG414 : Shakespeare

Shakespeare’s art and craft through study of important plays: comedies, tragedies, and histories.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG416 : Milton

Critical study of Milton’s major and minor works to estimate his present day literary and political significance.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG432 : Special Topics in Literature

The study of a body of literature, organized around a single theme, announced at advanced registration.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG436 : Irish Literature

Readings in Irish literature, with emphasis on Yeats and Joyce.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG196, 211, 213, 296, or 298.

ENG440 : Independent Study

With the approval and permission of a member of the English faculty and the Chair of the English Department, students may undertake independent reading and research on a topic of their own choosing.

Credit Hour(s)

1 - 3

ENG460 : Internship

Students may receive graduation credit for internships with appropriate disciplinary content that meet the faculty-approved criteria for academic internships. Such experiences include a significant reflective component and must be supervised by a full-time member of the Georgetown College faculty.

Credit Hour(s)

1 - 3

Prerequisites

consent of the supervising instructor.

ENG462 : Topics in Writing and Literature

The study of a body of literature, announced at registration, with special emphasis given to an analysis of the techniques of the writers studied.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

ENG112, 115, or HON200.

WST112 : Women and Culture: An Introduction

A chronological, interdisciplinary survey of women’s major cultural and artistic contributions. Offered only as a Foundations 112 course.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

FDN111.

WST211 : Introduction to Women’s Studies

An interdisciplinary study of women and gender viewed through historical and contemporary readings. Emphasizes analysis of new and traditional representations and interpretations of women’s experiences.

Credit Hour(s)

3

WST450 : Senior Seminar in Women’s Studies

Senior research seminar for students minoring in women’s studies. Non-minors may take the course with the approval of the program coordinator.

Credit Hour(s)

3

Prerequisites

WST211.