2020-2021
Foundations and Core

The Foundations & Core program requirements at Georgetown College are distribution requirements, allowing each student considerable choice of courses to meet requirements yet ensuring that the student has experience with a broad range of ideas and subjects. Courses are required in significant areas of knowledge and human experience. Students must enroll in FDN111 in the fall semester of their first year and continuously enroll in the Foundations sequence (FDN111 and FDN112) until successful completion.

The Foundations and Core curriculum provides the framework in which all Georgetown students will take on the project of their own academic formation. The curriculum is a framework providing students with opportunities to discover what they are called to do and be, to cultivate habits of mind conducive to a life of continued intellectual, physical, and spiritual growth, and to equip themselves with the tools necessary to assess critically and sustain or transform the social worlds of which they are a part.

Goals

Across the curriculum, both within and across disciplines, and at a variety of levels, students will gain:

  1. Knowledge of human cultures and the physical world through study in fine arts, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences, religious studies, wellness, cultural awareness, and foreign languages.
  2. Intellectual and practical skill, including academic inquiry and analysis, critical thinking, creative thinking, written communication, and quantitative literacy.

Learning Outcomes

Through the completion of the Foundations and Core curriculum, students acquire core knowledge about:

  1. fine arts
  2. humanities
  3. social or behavioral sciences
  4. natural sciences
  5. religious studies
  6. wellness
  7. cultural awareness
  8. a foreign language 

and demonstrate skill in:

  1. academic inquiry and analysis
  2. critical thinking
  3. creative thinking
  4. written communication
  5. quantitative literacy

 

Overview of the Program

 

THE FOUNDATIONS

Foundations 111 and 112

All entering freshmen will take Foundations 111 and 112 in their first two semesters. The fall semester Foundations 111 course is designed to equip students with foundational skills in academic inquiry, analysis, argument, critical thinking and discussion, and expression of ideas. Students will cultivate these skills while exploring a set of significant works from literature, philosophy, religion, the natural and social sciences, and the fine arts. The course materials will be historically organized and will engage issues within a theme of perennial or pressing concern. The spring semester Foundations 112 course is designed to reinforce the skill development from Foundations 111, but the work will be done in modestly interdisciplinary courses engaging a variety of topics.

Essential Proficiencies

Students will develop essential proficiencies in writing, mathematics, a world language, and wellness. To develop basic writing and quantitative proficiencies, students will complete the freshman composition and math requirements. Students will also demonstrate an essential proficiency in a world language, enabling them to communicate at an intermediate level in a second language and explore the culture of that language. Finally, students will obtain an essential proficiency in wellness by exploring the relationships between physical activity, nutrition, and health and fitness.

 

THE CORE

Areas of Inquiry

Students will acquire a core of knowledge addressing major questions in the following Areas of Inquiry, including courses at introductory and higher levels.

Fine Arts

The study of the ways in which visual art, music, and theatre are created and encountered.

Humanities

The study and analysis of human experience, ideas, and cultures using the methods and traditions of philosophers, historians, and writers.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

The study and analysis of behavioral, social, political and economic processes and organizations using the standards and practices of scientific inquiry.

Natural Sciences

The study and analysis of the natural world using modern scientific methodology and laboratory and field experiences.

Religious Studies

The study and analysis of the Christian Scriptures, cultural and historical religious phenomena, Christian theology, and world religions.

Flags

Writing Flags will provide opportunities for students to apply basic composition skills to more sophisticated tasks and receive further instruction in the writing process as they take on discipline-specific projects. Please note:

  • Students must complete their Essential Proficiency Writing requirements before they can receive credit for a Flagged Writing class.
  • Students may receive writing credit for no more than one Writing Flag in any one semester.

Cultural Awareness Flags are designed to expand students’ understanding of different cultural traditions and minority perspectives in courses that include a significant focus on these goals.

 

CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION

Students must enroll continuously in the Writing Sequence until successful completion. Students eligible to begin the sequence with ENG111 or HON200 must enroll in one of those classes their first fall semester. Students eligible to begin with ENG112 must enroll no later than their first spring semester. For a student to drop one of these four classes, the drop slip must be signed by the chair of the English Department, the Writing Program Coordinator, or the Provost. The chair of the English Department or the Writing Program Coordinator may waive this continuous enrollment policy as appropriate.

 

CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT IN QUANTITATIVE PROFICIENCY COURSES

Students with strong backgrounds in mathematics will be placed at course levels commensurate with demonstrated ability. After earning twenty-four credit hours, any student who has not completed the quantitative proficiency requirement must enroll in a course that completes this requirement and in each subsequent semester must enroll in such a course until he/she completes the course with a grade of D or better or transfers in a course deemed to satisfy the requirement. For students falling under the requirement of continuous enrollment, drops during the semester can only be approved by the MPC Department Chair or the Mathematics Program Coordinator. For students with a math subscore on the ACT of less than 19 (or its equivalent), initial placement is in MAT115 (Liberal Arts Mathematics). Exceptions to this placement can be made by the MPC Department Chair, the Mathematics Program Coordinator, or the Provost.

 

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY

Students must demonstrate proficiency through the intermediate level in a language other than English. Students for whom English is a second language and/or who are heritage speakers should contact the chair of the Department of World Languages as they are potentially eligible for an exemption from the world language requirement in the Foundations & Core program.

LANGUAGE PLACEMENT GUIDELINES

Spanish

SPA101 credit will not be given to students who have completed two years or more (level II or higher) of high school Spanish. A student can demonstrate proficiency in Spanish by passing SPA201, passing SPA230, or by passing a departmental 201 proficiency exam. The online Spanish placement test is intended to establish a student’s appropriate class level, but is not a measure of proficiency.

French

Students with less than two years of high school French (level II or higher) desiring to continue in French should register for FRE115 in the spring semester. Students with three or more years of French at the high school   who feel reasonably comfortable with the language should enroll in FRE201 in the fall semester. Students who have successfully completed 200-level courses will not be allowed to take 100-level courses unless approved by the WLN department chair. This policy applies to students who have taken language courses at Georgetown College or another college/university.

German

Students with less than two years of high school German should register for GER101 in the fall semester. Students with two years or more of German at the high school level should enroll in GER102 in the spring semester or GER201 in the fall semester. Students who have successfully completed 200-level courses will not be allowed to take 100-level courses unless approved by the WLN department chair. This policy applies to students who have taken language courses at Georgetown College or another college/university.

Japanese

Students with two years or more of Japanese at the high school level desiring to continue in the same language should consult with the WLN department chair for placement.

Latin

Students with two years or more of Latin at the high school level desiring to continue in the same language should consult with the WLN department chair for placement.
 

TECHNOLOGY LITERACY

Technology proficiency, as demonstrated in the successful completion of Foundations & Core program coursework, is a requirement for graduation. Students must demonstrate basic proficiencies in the use of computers and related information technology resources.

 

FOUNDATIONS AND CORE CHECKLIST

FOUNDATIONS:

6 hours

  • [ ] FDN111 (3 hours) and
  • [ ] FDN112 (3 hours—may also count as AOI)

Enroll in FDN111 in the first semester of the first year and continuously enroll in the Foundations sequence until successful completion.

Transfer students with 24 or more transferable hours may bypass Foundations 111. Transfer students with 36 or more transferable hours may bypass both Foundations 111 and 112.

ESSENTIAL PROFICIENCIES:

11-16 hours

Writing

  • [ ] ENG111 and [ ] ENG112 (6 hours); or
  • [ ] HON200 (3 hours)

Enroll in one of the above in the fall semester of the first year and continuously enroll in the writing sequence until successful completion. Students with an ACT subscore in English of 30 or higher may bypass ENG111.

Quantitative

  • [ ] Any Math course at or above MAT107 (3 hours)

After earning 24 credit hours, any student who has not completed this requirement must enroll in a course that completes this requirement and in each subsequent semester must enroll in such a course until he/she completes the course with a grade of D or better or transfers in an approved course.
Elementary Education Majors: Take MAT 203 and 204

World Languages

  • [ ] Any language through 201 level (3-9 hours)

Intermediate proficiency through FRE201, GER201, GRK201/ REL203, JPN201, LAT201, or SPA201 (Students for whom English is a second language and heritage speakers may be eligible for an exemption. Contact the WLN Dept. Chair)

Wellness

  • [ ] KHS100 (1 hour) 

 

CORE:

Flagged Courses

  • [ ] [ ] C Flags (Cultural Awareness--two required)
  • [ ] [ ] W Flags (Writing Intensive—two required) Important note: A student must complete the essential proficiency writing requirement before earning a W flag. A student may receive W credit for only one W flagged course per semester.

See course schedule for designated flagged courses. Flagged courses are noted in the title of the courses as W and C. Students transferring to Georgetown College with 52 or more credit hours will be required to satisfy, or demonstrate equivalencies for, two Foundations and Core flagged courses at GC: one writing and one cultural awareness. Students may receive one Cultural Awareness flag by studying abroad, provided that they receive at least 3 hours of academic credit from a Georgetown- approved study abroad program.

Areas of Inquiry (AOI):

31-35 hours across five areas

All 11 courses required must be taken in the Areas of Inquiry offerings, with at least ONE course numbered 200 or higher in at least THREE of the five Areas of Inquiry.

AREA OF INQUIRY #1 – FINE ARTS

[ ] [ ] TWO courses (4-6 hrs). Enroll in TWO different departments.

  • Art: ART115, 117, 119, 121, 123, 125, 170, 210, 212, 220, 222, 310, 313
  • Music: MUS107, 126, 147, 191, 195, 149, 305, 307, 309, 315, 335, 358
  • Theatre: THE107, 171, 220, 225, 227, 347, 407, 425, SPA327

Elementary Education Majors: Take two of the following: ART313, MUS315, or THE407

AREA OF INQUIRY #2 -- HUMANITIES

THREE courses (9 hrs). Enroll in each of the following THREE subject areas.

  • [ ] History (3 hrs.) HIS111, 113, 211, 213, 223, 225, 331, 333
  • [ ] Philosophy (3 hrs.) PHI151, 152, 195, 201, 325, 335, 345, 355, 365, 385
  • [ ] Western &World Literature (3 hrs.) ENG196, 211, 213, 296, 298, 337, 343, 345; CLA170, 314, 316, 318; SPA320, 322
AREA OF INQUIRY #3 -- SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

[ ] [ ] TWO courses (6 hrs). Enroll in TWO different departments/programs.

  • Communication & Media Studies: COMM101, 200, 312, 323, 325, 329, 331, 400, 418
  • Economics: ECO221, 223
  • Political Science: POS100, 201, 210, 300, 307
  • Psychology: PSY111, 163, 242, 260, 470
  • Sociology: SOC111, 113, 118, 365, 380, 390
AREA OF INQUIRY #4 -- NATURAL SCIENCES

[ ] [ ] TWO courses (6-8 hrs). Enroll in TWO different departments/ programs, one of which must include a laboratory.

  • Biology: BIO100, 111
  • Chemistry: CHE100, 102, 111, 171, 271, (112, 201, 211 – have prerequisites)
  • Geology: GEL113
  • Physics: PHY105, 115, 117, (211, 212 – have prerequisites) 

Elementary Education Majors: Take both courses with laboratory, one of which must be BIO

AREA OF INQUIRY #5 -- RELIGIOUS STUDIES

TWO courses (6 hrs.) Enroll in TWO courses, one of which must include a Biblical Studies course.

  • [ ] Biblical Studies: REL117, 231, 233, 235, 237, 371, 373
  • [ ] The SECOND can come from Biblical Studies OR from any of the following: REL243, 245, 253, 255, 257, 353, 357

Students transferring to Georgetown College with 52 or more credit hours will be required to satisfy, or demonstrate equivalencies for, all Areas of Inquiry requirements with the following exception: these students must take at least one class numbered 200 or higher in at least two of the Areas of Inquiry.

Visit Georgetown College